History of the Chevy Task Force Trucks (1955-59)

The 1955 model Chevy Task Force is the truck that Harrison Ford’s character, Bob Falfa, drove in “American Graffiti,” the movie that was more about vintage automobiles than coming of age in the ‘50s. The same truck, in gray primer, played a starring role in “Two-Lane Blacktop.”



Chevy Task Force trucks were produced from 1955 to 1959 and was known as the Blue Chip Series. Very few changes were made through the years but the make differed greatly from the Advanced Design trucks from the previous generation. Those differences were the wrap-around windshield; a wrap-around rear windshield on Deluxe cab models; power brakes and steering (a first for Chevy); a 12-volt electrical system; and headlights in the fenders. 1955 was the only year that Chevy offered a 7’ truck bed for the Task Force. Names included Apache (light duty), Viking (medium duty), Spartan (heavy duty), Suburban Carrier, and for the first time, the Cameo Carrier.

Chevy couldn’t decide where to put the emblem so it would appear below the horizontal fender line one year, above it the next. 1958 brought the most significant changes with 4 headlights instead of two and factory installed air conditioning.

Powertrain options ranged from 235 cubic inch Straight Six; 265 cubic inch V8; and the 283 cubic inch V8 with either a 3- or 4-speed manual Hydramatic transmission.